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COP23 : Adaptation to Climate Change

 

AROUND THE WORLD

Millions Displaced

In the report Shock Waves: Managing the Impacts of Climate Change on Poverty,  the World Bank indicates that 100 million people could find themselves in extreme poverty by 2030 due to climate change.

According to the London School of Economics, of the 10 million people living in the Pacific Islands (including Fiji), up to 1.7 million may have to be moved by 2050 on account of climate change.

According to a recent report by Oxfam International entitled “Uprooted by Climate Change”, people living in the world’s poorest countries are five times more likely to be displaced because of extreme weather events. Over the period from 2008 to 2016, an average of 21.8 million people a year were forced to move, a figure that is expected to rise.

According to the Lancet Countdown on Health and Climate Change, one billion people may have to migrate by the end of the century on account of global warming.

Source : Oxfam International

According to “Lancet Countdown on health and climate Change”,  one billion people may have to migrate by the end of the century on account of global warming.

Impacts on agriculture and health

A review by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) shows that in developing countries, agriculture (crops, breeding, fishing, aquaculture and forestry) accounts for 26% of all loss and damage associated with average-to-high-intensity storms and floods.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the global risk of heat-related disease or death has risen regularly since 1980, with some 30% of the world’s population now living in climate conditions that produce extremely lengthy heat waves. Between 2000 and 2016, the number of vulnerable people exposed to heat waves rose by some 125 million.

IN Canada

Climate change is very real, and Canada too is beginning to feel the effects (floods, wildfires, heat waves and so forth).

The worst natural disaster Canadians saw in 2016, the Fort Mc Murray fires (which have only just now been put out!), caused some $3.7 billion in insurance damages – more than double that of the previous most expensive natural disaster on record.

Extreme weather events and natural disasters continue to occur across the country and with greater frequency. Here are some of the worst recorded in 2016:

Extreme weather events and natural disasters continue to occur across the country and with greater frequency. Here are some of the worst recorded in 2016:

March 23-26 Southern Ontario Ice Storm (Fergus, Orangeville, Barrie, Newmarket)
May 3-19 Fort McMurray Wild Fire (Wood Buffalo, Fort McMurray)
June 24-25 Northern Ontario and Prairie Storms (Saskatoon, West Hawk Lake, Killarney, Thunder Bay)
June 28-30 Prairie Storms (Calgary, Edmonton, Okotoks, Southern Saskatchewan and Manitoba)
July 8 Southern Ontario Storms (Bradford, Markdale, London)
July 8-11 Western Canada Storms (Edmonton, Calgary, Estevan, Southwestern Manitoba)
July 15-16 Prairie Storms (Calgary, Swift Current)
July 18-20 Southern Prairie Storms (Medicine Hat, Outlook, Winnipeg)
July 22 Moose Jaw Hailstorm (Moose Jaw)
July 27 Ontario-Quebec Storms (Toronto, Saguenay)
July 30 – August 1 Prairie Storms (Calgary, Airdrie, Fort McMurray, Yorkton, Melville, Winnipeg)
September 28-30 Windsor Flooding (Windsor, LaSalle, Tecumseh)
October 9-11 Atlantic Flooding (Cape Breton Regional Municipality, the Connaigre Peninsula, the central region and south coast of the island portion of Newfoundland and Labrador)

This is not to mention the severe flooding in several regions of Quebec in the spring of 2017.


Financer l’adaptation aux changements climatiques 

The Paris Agreement calls for $100 billion a year to be spent in the fight against climate change until the year 2025. Of this amount, Canada announced in 2015 that it would contribute $2.65 billion to help developing countries manage the effects of climate change.

Putting funding mechanisms in place to assist the developing countries will prove one of the major issues of COP23.

STEVEN GUILBEAULT TALKS ABOUT ADAPTATION TO CLIMATE CHANGE: 

 

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